< Blogs | 12.09.2018 |

Stand by your plan

Stand by your plan

I often find myself asking the same question… when do I have time to revise? Life is hectic.

You can get so caught up in work, commitments and socialising, especially with the hot, sunny weather we’ve had all summer. But remember, these exams are worth it and you will reap the benefits during and at the end of your studies.

Plan, plan, plan! Make sure you plan each week accordingly and don’t say these words: ‘I’ll do it later’. I don’t know about you, but every time I say these words, I never actually revise! You do need to be strict with yourself and use your time wisely. One idea is to have a calendar on the wall and to spread out your revision timetable for the upcoming weeks or even months.

If you have plans on the weekend, then prioritise your revision time on the weekdays/weeknights. I tend not to make social plans that last the whole weekend, as I feel that revision should be more of a priority if you want to achieve your end goal within your timescale. I completely empathise with the fact that you may feel that you have no social life at the moment but remember, this is not a lifetime commitment. There is an end date and it’s going to help you in the future! Focus on that end date and make sure that you reward yourself.

REFRESH YOUR SURROUNDINGS

If you feel like you can’t study at home, then try and get into work early or stay later. You also have the option of going to the library. If you are a postgraduate, most universities allow you to use their library. Get in touch with them. If you have lived away from university and now moved back home, some universities will still allow you to study in their library. If your employer allows it, there are revision days through your local institute that you can attend.

There are many ways that you can revise. Choose what suits you. Ask yourself what works for you and your lifestyle.

You also have the option of studying while travelling. I travel to work on the train. At the beginning, I found it difficult to revise on the train because it’s always so busy. I used to bring my study textbook with me, but realised it was too big to use from. I therefore ended up purchasing the key facts A5 booklet. This is perfect to use while travelling. No matter how long the train, bus or tram journey is, a little studying can go a long way without even realising it.


THREE THINGS TO TAKE AWAY

Ahead of the game: Plan out your study time for the next few weeks and stick to it

Work hard, play hard: Prioritise your studies over socialising, then reward yourself afterwards

Surround sound: Finding a new place to study, like a local library, can help you focus


Anna Barnes is compliance & technical services assistant at Munich Re

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